Friday Black by Nana Kwame Adjei-Brenyah

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Friday Black by Nana Kwame Adjei-Brenyah

14.99

Tomiko’s pick: If you liked Her Body and Other Parties and Sorry to Bother You, this book is for you! Beautiful writing about ugly realities. Adjei-Brenyah has a way of naming byproducts of capitalism and white supremacy, the way they manifest in our dynamics and identities that paint very real characters and worlds. I wasn’t planning on adding another book to my reading list but the first story had my jaw on the floor, and the surprises only keep coming. I also didn’t think the nature of consumer culture and Black Friday specifically could be any more unnerving to me, but Nana Kwame did it! Roxane Gay said “Read this book”, and I am a changed person for it. I would like to echo her words to you all. Read this book.

About the book: From the start of this extraordinary debut, Nana Kwame Adjei-Brenyah’s writing will grab you, haunt you, enrage and invigorate you. By placing ordinary characters in extraordinary situations, Adjei-Brenyah reveals the violence, injustice, and painful absurdities that black men and women contend with every day in this country.

These stories tackle urgent instances of racism and cultural unrest, and explore the many ways we fight for humanity in an unforgiving world. In “The Finkelstein Five,” Adjei-Brenyah gives us an unforgettable reckoning of the brutal prejudice of our justice system. In “Zimmer Land,” we see a far-too-easy-to-believe imagining of racism as sport. And “Friday Black” and “How to Sell a Jacket as Told by Ice King” show the horrors of consumerism and the toll it takes on us all.

Entirely fresh in its style and perspective, and sure to appeal to fans of Colson Whitehead, Marlon James, and George Saunders, Friday Black confronts readers with a complicated, insistent, wrenching chorus of emotions, the final note of which, remarkably, is hope.

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